Mahatma Gandhi Greatest Speeches Collection of All Time

Mahatma Gandhi Speech
Mahatma Gandhi Speech


Mahatma Gandhi Greatest Speeches Collection of All Time: Indian nationalist leader. Born Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on October 2, 1869, in Porbandar, Kathiawar, West India. He studied law in London, but in 1893 went to South Africa, where he spent 20 years opposing discriminatory legislation against Indians. As a pioneer of Satyagraha or resistance through mass non-violent civil disobedience, he became one of the major political and spiritual leaders of his time. Satyagraha remains one of the most potent philosophies in freedom struggles throughout the world today.
In 1914, Gandhi returned to India, where he supported the Home Rule movement, and became the leader of the Indian National Congress, advocating a policy of non-violent non-co-operation to achieve independence. His goal was to help poor farmers and labourers protest oppressive taxation and discrimination. He struggled to alleviate poverty, liberate women and put an end to caste discrimination, with the ultimate objective being self-rule for India.
Following his civil disobedience campaign (1919-22), he was jailed for conspiracy (1922-4). In 1930, he led a landmark 320 km/200 mi to march to the sea to collect salt in symbolic defiance of the government monopoly. On his release from prison (1931), he attended the London Round Table Conference on Indian constitutional reform. In 1946, he negotiated with the Cabinet Mission which recommended the new constitutional structure. After independence (1947), he tried to stop the Hindu-Muslim conflict in Bengal, a policy which led to his assassination in Delhi by Nathuram Godse, a Hindu fanatic.
Even after his death, Gandhi's commitment to non-violence and his belief in simple living--making his own clothes, eating a vegetarian diet, and using fasts for self-purification as well as a means of protest--have been a beacon of hope for oppressed and marginalized people throughout the world.

 

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Mahatma Gandhi Greatest Speeches
Mahatma Gandhi Greatest Speeches

 

MAHATMA GANDHI’S SPEECH ON GOD

 

Sisters and Brothers of America,

There is an indefinable mysterious power that pervades everything, I feel it though I do not see it. It is this unseen power which makes itself felt and yet defies all proof because it is so unlike all that I perceive through my senses. It transcends the senses.

But it is possible to reason out the existence of God to a limited extent. Even in ordinary affairs, we know that people do not know who rules or why and how He rules and yet they know that there is a power that certainly rules. In my tour last year in Mysore I met many poor villagers, and I found upon inquiry that they did not know who ruled Mysore. They simply said some God ruled it. If the knowledge of these poor people was so limited about their ruler I, who am infinitely lesser in respect to God than they to their ruler need not be surprised if I do not realize the presence of God – the King of Kings.

Nevertheless, I do feel, as the poor villagers felt about Mysore, that there is orderliness in the universe, there is an unalterable law governing everything and every being that exists or lives. It is not a blind law, for no blind law can govern the conduct of living being and thanks to the marvellous researches of Sir J. C. Bose it can now be proved that even matter is life. That law then which governs all life is God. Law and the law-giver are one.

I may not deny the law or the law-giver because I know so little about it or Him. Just as my denial or ignorance of the existence of an earthly power will avail me nothing, even so, my denial of God and His law will not liberate me from its operation, whereas humble and mute acceptance of divine authority makes life’s journey easier even as the acceptance of earthly rule makes life under it easier. I do dimly perceive that while everything around me is ever-changing, ever dying there is underlying all that change a living power that is changeless, that holds all together, that creates, dissolves and recreates.

That informing power of spirit is God, and since nothing else that I see merely through the senses can or will persist, He alone is. And is this power benevolent or malevolent? I see it as purely benevolent, for I can see that amid death life persists, amid untruth truth persists, amid darkness light persists. Hence I gather that God is life, truth, light. He is love. He is the supreme Good. But He is no God who merely satisfies the intellect if He ever does. God to be God must rule the heart and transform it. He must express himself in every smallest act of His votary.

This can only be done through a definite realization, more real than the five senses can ever produce. Sense perceptions can be and often are false and deceptive, however real they may appear to us. Where there is realization outside the senses it is infallible.

It is proved not by extraneous evidence but in the transformed conduct and character of those who have felt the real presence of God within. Such testimony is to be found in the experiences of an unbroken line of prophets and sages in all countries and climes. To reject this evidence is to deny oneself. This realization is preceded by an immovable faith.

He who would in his own person test the fact of God’s presence can do so by a living faith and since faith itself cannot be proved by extraneous evidence the safest course is to believe in the moral government of the world and therefore in the supremacy of the moral law, the law of truth and love. Exercise of faith will be the safest where there is a clear determination summarily to reject all that is contrary to truth and love.

I confess that I have no argument to convince through reason. Faith transcends reason.

All that I can advise is not to attempt the impossible.



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Mahatma Gandhi Speech on non-violence
Mahatma Gandhi Speech on non-violence

 

MAHATMA GANDHI SPEECH The ‘Quit India’ Speech (8 August 1942)



“I believe that in the history of the world, there has not been a more genuinely democratic struggle for freedom than ours.”

Smithsonian refers to this address as the “speech that brought India to the brink of independence”. Gandhiji’s address to the nation on the eve of the historic Quit India movement enshrines our ideals of Ahimsa (non-violence) and freedom. Calling upon the British to leave India voluntarily, Mahatma Gandhi inspired millions of Indians to seek out freedom from bondage and slavery. The novelty of his approach and the call to use non-violent means singled him out as one of the greatest leaders the world has ever known.



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Mahatma Gandhi Speech on Peace
Mahatma Gandhi Speech on Peace

 

 

MAHATMA GANDHI SPEECH Benaras Hindu University Speech (4 February 1916)



“If we are to receive self-government, we shall have to take it… freedom-loving as it (British Empire) is, it will not be a party to give freedom to a people who will not take it themselves.”

In February 1916, Mahatma Gandhi was invited by Pt. Madan Mohan Malviya to speak at the inauguration of the Benaras Hindu University. The speech came as a shock to one and all present. The royal kings and princes, Annie Besant, and everyone else had come to expect the condescending tone adopted by Indian leaders towards the British. Gandhiji’s sharp criticism of the English language and demand for self-government jolted the audience and for the first time, the Mahatma showed signs of taking on the leadership of the country’s freedom struggle. This was the very first speech which would grow into a wildfire culminating in India’s freedom from the British rule. 




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Mahatma Gandhi Speech for Student
Mahatma Gandhi Speech for Student


 

MAHATMA GANDHI SPEECH

THE GREAT TRIAL OF (1922 – 18TH MARCH 1922)



“I do not plead any extenuating act. I am here, therefore, to invite and cheerfully submit to the highest penalty that can be inflicted upon me for what in law is a deliberate crime, and what appears to me to be the highest duty of a citizen”

“I came reluctantly to the conclusion that the British connection had made India more helpless than she ever was before, politically and economically”

The speech given by Mahatma Gandhi in the Great Trial of 1922 was a legal statement rather being a speech. Mahatma Gandhi was convicted for spreading dissatisfactions against the British Rule. Mahatma Gandhi had given his statement to the Judge and pleaded that he accepts all the charges, and demands for the highest penalty.

He accepted that he was solely responsible for some non-violence incidents happened during his movement. The Judge in the court was completely shaken by the determination of a man cladded in a white piece of cloth as this was the first time when a convict demanded the penalty for himself. Gandhiji also criticized the British government for their oppressive and cruel policies in India.


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Best Speeches of Mahatma Gandhi
Best Speeches of Mahatma Gandhi


 

MAHATMA GANDHI SPEECH

Round Table Conference Speech, (30 November 1931)



“I dare to say, it (the strife between Hindus and Muslims in India) is coeval with the British Advent, and immediately this relationship, the unfortunate, artificial, unnatural relationship between Great Britain and India is transformed into a natural relationship, when it becomes if it does become, a voluntary partnership to be given up, to be dissolved at the will of either party, when it becomes that you will find that Hindus, Mussalmans, Sikhs, Europeans, Anglo-Indians, Christians, Untouchable, will all live together as one man.”

This is the speech that Gandhi delivered at the very first Round Table Conference. It is here that the British tried to convince Indian leaders to accept Dominion status citing communal disharmony and strife. A bold Mahatma Gandhi clearly called the British bluff and showcased India’s unity and secular spirit. Our nation’s history has been altered by British historians, he said, and once again we shall sing our song of love and brotherhood in unison.  



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Famous Speech of Mahatma Gandhi
Famous Speech of Mahatma Gandhi

 MAHATMA GANDHI SPEECH

Dandi March Speech (11 March 1930)

 

“We have resolved to utilize all our resources in the pursuit of an exclusively nonviolent struggle. Let no one commit a wrong in anger.”

It was on the eve of this historic Salt March to Dandi that Mahatma Gandhi outlined a well-thought-out a programme for non-cooperation. Setting out to manufacture salt from seawater with his followers, he called upon fellow Indians to defy the taxes imposed by the British. He asked Indians to give up foreign liquor and clothes, resist taxes, and avoid (British) courts and government offices. Not only did this speech compel Indians to join the freedom struggle and challenge the colonial rule but also influenced the Civil Rights Movement in the US decades later. It was instrumental in the introduction of the “satyagraha” into the Indian psyche. 





 

Speech before His Final Fast (12 January 1948)




“I yearn for heart friendship between the Hindus, the Sikhs and the Muslims. It subsisted between them the other day. Today it is non-existent. It is a state that no Indian patriot worthy of the name can contemplate with equanimity.”

India had gained its independence but this came with a terrible price. A painful and violent partition had led to a complete breakdown of communal harmony – a camaraderie that had existed for hundreds of years. Pained, the Mahatma took to fasting once more – another stand, another non-violent struggle, another sacrifice for the sake of our beloved nation and the well-being of all Indians. This speech of his, delivered days before his death, should be our religion, our inspiration in building a peaceful, more tolerant India.


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Mahatma Gandhi Speech That Changes the World
Mahatma Gandhi Speech That Changes the World


 

MAHATMA GANDHI SPEECH

Speech Before Inter-Asian Relations Conference




I do not think that I should apologize to you for having to speak in a foreign tongue. I wonder if this loudspeaker carries my voice to the farthest end of this vast audience. If some of those who are far away are unable to listen to what I may say, it will be the fault of the loudspeaker.
I was going to tell you that I do not wish to apologize. I dare not. You cannot understand the provincial language, which is my mother tongue. I do not want to insult you by speaking in my own language (Gujarati). Our national speech is Hindustani. I know that it will be a long time before it can be made into an international speech. For international commerce, undoubtedly, English occupies the first place. I used to hear that French was the language of diplomacy. I was told, when I was young, that if I wanted to go from one end of Europe to the other, I must try to pick up French. I tried to learn French, in order that I may be able to make myself understood. There is a rivalry between the French and the English. Having been taught English, I have naturally to resort to it.
I was wondering, as to what I was to speak to you. I wanted to collect my thoughts, but, let me confess to you that I had no time. Yet I had promised yesterday that I would try to say a few words. While I was coming with Badshah Khan, I asked for a little piece of paper and pencil. I got a pen, instead of a pencil. I tried to scribble a few words. You will be sorry to hear that piece of paper is not by my side, though I remember what I wanted to say.
You, friends, have not seen the real India and you are not meeting in a conference in the midst of real India. Delhi, Bombay, Madras, Calcutta, Lahore-all these are big cities and are, therefore, influenced by the West.
I then thought of a story. It was in French and was translated for me by an Anglo-French philosopher. He was an unselfish man. He befriended me without having known me because he always sided with the minorities. I was not then in my own country. I was not only in a hopeless minority, but in a despised minority, if the Europeans in South Africa will forgive me for saying so. I was a coolie lawyer. At the time, we had no coolie doctors, and we had no coolie lawyers. I was the first in the field. You know, perhaps, what is meant by the word ‘coolie’.
This friend–his mother was a French woman and his father was an Englishmen–said: “I want to translate for you a French story. There were three scientists who went out from France in search of the truth. They went to different parts of Asia. One of them found his way to India. He began to search. He went to the so-called cities of those times–naturally, this was before the British occupation, before even the Mogul period. He saw the so-called high caste people, men and women, till he felt at a loss. Finally, he went to one humble cottage and there he found the truth that he was in search of.”
If you really want to see India villages at its best, you have to find it in the humble bhangi homes of such villages. There are seven lakhs of such villages, and thirty-eighty crores of people inhabit them.
If some of you see the Indian villages, you will not be fascinated by the sight. You will have to scratch below the dung heap. I do not pretend to say that they were places of paradise. Today, they are really dung heaps. They were not like that before. What I say is not from history, but from what I have seen myself. I have travelled from one end of India to the other, and I have seen the miserable specimens of humanity with the lustreless eyes. They are India. In these humble cottages, in the midst of these dung heaps, are to be found humble bhangis, in whom you find the concentrated essence of wisdom.
Again, I have learnt from books–books written by English historians. We read books written in English historians, but we do not write in our own mother tongue, or in the national language Hindustani. We study our history through English books, rather than through originals. That is the cultural conquest which India has undergone.
The first of these wise men was Zoroaster. He belonged to the East. He was followed by Buddha who belonged to the East–India. Who followed Buddha? Jesus, who came from the East. Before Jesus was Moses who belonged to Palestine, though he was born in Egypt. And after Jesus came Mohamed. I omit my reference to Krishna and Rama and other lights. I do not call them lesser lights but they are lees known a single person in the world to match these men of Asia. And then what happened? Christianity became disfigured when it went to the West. I am sorry to have to say that–I would not talk any further.
I have told you the story, in order to make you understand that what you see in the big cities is not the real India. Certainly, the carnage that is going on before our very eyes is a shameful thing. As I said yesterday, do not carry the memory of that carnage beyond the confines of India.
What I want you to understand is the message of Asia. It is not to be learnt through the western spectacles or by imitating the atom bomb. If you want to give a message of truth. I do not want merely to appeal to your head. I want to capture your heart.
In this age of democracy, in this age of awakening of the poorest of the poor, you can redeliver this message with the greatest emphasis. You will complete the conquest of the West, not through vengeance, because you have been exploited, but with real understanding. I am sanguine, if all of you put your hearts together–not merely heads–to understand the secret of the message these wise men of the East have left to us, and us if we really become worthy of that great message, the conquest of the West will be completed. This conquest will be loved by the West itself.
The West is today pining for wisdom. It is despairing of a multiplication of the atom bombs, because the atom bombs mean utter destruction, not merely of the West, but of the whole world, as if the prophecy of the Bible is going to be fulfilled and there is to be a perfect deluge. It is up to you to tell the world of its wickedness and sin–that is the heritage of your teachers and my teachers have taught Asia. 



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Mahatma Gandhi Speech on Truth
Mahatma Gandhi Speech on Truth


MAHATMA GANDHI SPEECH

SPEECH AT MADRAS RECEPTION – (21ST APRIL 1915)



“If there is anything that we have deserved, as has been stated in this beautiful address, I can only say I lay it at the feet of my Master under whose inspiration I have been working all this time under exile in South Africa”

“In the great city of Johannesburg, the Madarasis look on a Madrasis as dishonoured if he has not passed through the jails once or twice during this terrible crisis that your countrymen in South Africa went through during these eight long years”

Mahatma Gandhi was welcomed in Madras in 1915. The speech he delivered in Madras was mostly a thanksgiving speech and basically a narration of the struggle in South Africa. He also emphasized the participation and sacrifices of the Indians in South Africa at the time of the civil rights crisis. It was the speech given in reply to the welcoming address by Mr G. A. Natesan on behalf of the South African League.



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Mahatma Gandhi Speech on Freedom
Mahatma Gandhi Speech on Freedom

 

 

Inspirational speech by Mahatma Gandhi
Kingsley Hall, 1931


 
There is an indefinable mysterious power that pervades everything; I feel it though I do not see it. It is this unseen power which makes itself felt and yet defies all proof because it is so unlike all that I perceive through my senses. It transcends the senses. But it is possible to reason out the existence of God to a limited extent. Even in ordinary affairs, we know that people do not know who rules, or why and how He rules, and yet they know that there is a power that certainly rules.
In my tour last year in Mysore, I met many poor villagers and I found upon inquiry that they did not know who ruled Mysore. They simply said some God ruled it. If the knowledge of these poor people was so limited about their ruler, I, who am infinitely lesser in respect to God than they to their ruler, need not be surprised if I do not realize the presence of God – the King of Kings.
Nevertheless, I do feel, as the poor villagers felt about Mysore, that there is orderliness in the universe. There is an unalterable law governing everything and every being that exists or lives. It is not a blind law, for no blind law can govern the conduct of living being and thanks to the marvellous researches of Sir J. C. Bose, it can now be proved that even matter is life. That law then which governs all life is God. Law and the law-giver are one. I may not deny the law, or the law-giver, because I know so little about it or Him.
Just as my denial or ignorance of the existence of an earthly power will avail me nothing, even so, my denial of God and His law will not liberate me from its operation, whereas humble and mute acceptance of divine authority makes life’s journey easier even as the acceptance of earthly rule makes life under it easier. I do dimly perceive that whilst everything around me is ever-changing, ever dying, there is underlying all that change a living power that is changeless, that holds all together, that creates, dissolves, and recreates. That informing power of spirit is God, and since nothing else that I see merely through the senses can or will persist, He alone is. And is this power benevolent or malevolent? I see it as purely benevolent, for I can see that in the midst of death, life persists, in the midst of untruth, truth persists, in the midst of darkness, light persists. Hence I gather that God is life, truth, and light. He is love. He is the supreme Good. But He is no God who merely satisfies the intellect if He ever does. God, to be God, must rule the heart and transform it. He must express himself in every smallest act of His votary. This can only be done through a definite realization, more real than the five senses can ever produce.
Sense perceptions can be and often are false and deceptive, however real they may appear to us. Where there is realization outside the senses it is infallible. It is proved not by extraneous evidence but in the transformed conduct and character of those who have felt the real presence of God within. Such testimony is to be found in the experiences of an unbroken line of prophets and sages in all countries and climes. To reject this evidence is to deny oneself. This realization is preceded by an immovable faith. He, who would, in his own person, test the fact of God’s presence, can do so by a living faith, and since faith itself cannot be proved by extraneous evidence, the safest course is to believe in the moral government of the world and therefore in the supremacy of the moral law, the law of truth and love. Exercise of faith will be the safest where there is a clear determination summarily to reject all that is contrary to truth and love. I confess that I have no argument to convince through reason. Faith transcends reason. All that I can advise is not to attempt the impossible.



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Mahatma Gandhi Speech on Equality
Mahatma Gandhi Speech on Equality

MAHATMA GANDHI SPEECH

SPEECH ON KASHMIR ISSUE, AT A PRAYER MEETING – (4TH JANUARY 1948)



“Today there is the talk of war everywhere. Everyone fears a war breaking out between the two countries. If that happens it will be a calamity both for India and for Pakistan”

 “I shall therefore humbly say to the responsible leaders of Pakistan that though we are now two countries – which is a thing I never wanted – we should at least try to arrive at an agreement so that we could live as peaceful neighbours”

In a prayer meeting on 04th January 1948, Mahatma Gandhi discussed the ongoing tension between India and Pakistan on the Kashmir Issue. As a follower of non-violence and peace, Gandhiji never wanted any conflicts between India and Pakistan. He was always a supporter of a dialogue system and wanted that both the countries should initiate a dialogue system and find a solution to the problem. He also emphasized the importance of the United Nations in initiating a settlement between the two countries.


Your beliefs become your thoughts. Your thoughts become your words. Your words become your actions. Your actions become your habits. Your habits become your values. Your values become your destiny. The future depends on what you do today. Mahatma Gandhi
What is your favourite Mahatma Gandhi's Speech? Would you like to add another one here? Please let me know in the comment section below!
 

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